1. Reblogged from: textsfromthe-avengers
  2. ‘Great Escape’ by Free Dominguez is my new jam.
  3. "Women shouldn’t be valued because we are strong, or kick-ass, but because we we are people. So don’t focus on writing characters who are strong. Write characters who are people."

    Reblogged from: studioghibligifs
  4. royals:

The #Royals go all out, all the time.

You wish you had speed like Billy Butler.

    royals:

    The #Royals go all out, all the time.

    You wish you had speed like Billy Butler.

    Reblogged from: royals
  5. issuesshow:

“Now I am not saying that Drax the Destroyer is, or was ever, intended to be autistic. All I am saying is that it warmed my heart to see my brother have an opportunity to identify himself with a character known for his strength, badassness, and honor.”

This is great!

    issuesshow:

    “Now I am not saying that Drax the Destroyer is, or was ever, intended to be autistic. All I am saying is that it warmed my heart to see my brother have an opportunity to identify himself with a character known for his strength, badassness, and honor.”

    This is great!

    Reblogged from: issuesshow
  6. mightyflynn:

Alex Gordon and friends
August 26, 2014
Kauffman Stadium
Kansas City, Missouri
Photo by Jaime Squire

Best outfielder playing today.

    mightyflynn:

    Alex Gordon and friends

    August 26, 2014

    Kauffman Stadium

    Kansas City, Missouri

    Photo by Jaime Squire

    Best outfielder playing today.

    Reblogged from: mightyflynn
  7. lnthefade:

Bill O’Reilly at his most Bill O’Reilly.

Where’s the hidden camera show that follows white people around as they are treated as if they were not white? 

    lnthefade:

    Bill O’Reilly at his most Bill O’Reilly.

    Where’s the hidden camera show that follows white people around as they are treated as if they were not white? 

    Reblogged from: lnthefade
  8. We hear “do what you love” so often from those few people who it did work for, for whom the stars aligned, and from them it sounds like good advice. They’re successful, aren’t they? If we follow their advice, we’ll be successful, too! […] We rarely hear the advice of the person who did what they loved and stayed poor or was horribly injured for it. Professional gamblers, stuntmen, washed up cartoonists like myself: we don’t give speeches at corporate events. We aren’t paid to go to the World Domination Summit and make people feel bad. We don’t land book deals or speak on Good Morning America.

    Rachel Nabors, “DON’T do what you love” (via austinkleon)

    I’ve long thought that my ideal interview website (magazine/book/podcast/etc) wouldn’t be one where the people who “made it” are interviewed. Those people are already interviewed enough. I want to hear from the school teacher who struggled through college and is just barely getting by, not the teacher of the year. I want to hear from the person who was student council president in high school and is now an auto mechanic because that is the only job he could find, not the president of the United States. I want to hear about the woman who thought she could find a rich husband but didn’t and is now a minimum wage worker at McDonalds, not Kim Kardashian.

    I’ve long thought that we give to much weight to monetary success as being the only thing we thing is worth trying to be successful at. I want to hear from those who have struggled; not to become successful but, to just live. There has to be more meaning in the struggle of living than in the celebration of ‘winning’ life. 

    My idea would be a 30 minute conversation between an interviewer and someone who is not famous and who has not become successful. Yes, there will be those that are vile and insulting and horrible people but, I think that hearing them speak can help people find their own beliefs just as well as hearing Bill Gates, John Lennon, or Barak Obama speak.

    Sometimes we don’t need to be inspired to go create amazing things for others to enjoy. Sometimes we need to be reminded that life is hard and the struggle is real. Sometimes we just need to listen to those who we don’t normally listen to.

    Reblogged from: cottonbureau
  9. lnthefade:

Screen shot from a New York Times article.
No angel.
When I was 18, I was no angel. Hell, when I was 15, 16, 17, I was no angel. When I was 13, I stole change out of cars that were parked in the church lot for bingo night. By 14 I was smoking pot every day. I got caught shoplifting at Korvette’s and spent an hour being interrogated by security before they called my mother to pick me up. I cut holes in the pockets of my winter parka to make it easier to steal candy from 7-11. I sold joints to my fellow classmates at Holy Trinity High School. I had rough patches. I cut out of school to drink alcohol. I listened to angry and vulgar punk rock. I often got into fights with kids from the neighboring town.
So all those times when Officer Goldberg stopped me as I walking down the street and asked where I was going and what I was doing, he would be justified in shooting me because I was a troubled kid with a questionable past?
See, all those things were not relevant. Because Officer Goldberg didn’t know any of those things about me beforehand. And even if he did, they had no relevance on the fact that I happened to be walking down the street on any given evening.
Someone’s history does not always define their present. Being a “troubled” kid who once climbed over a baby gate or wrote on the walls in their house with pencils does not mean one deserves to die in a hail of bullets at the hand of a police officer. And it’s odious for anyone to imply as such, especially in a major newspaper on the day of the dead boy’s funeral.
The media suddenly seems to be in bed with the Ferguson police, posthumously trying Michael Brown for the crime of being young and black while walking in the street, bringing his past into the present. Calling him “no angel” has big implications, none of them good. 
We’re all “no angels” in one way or another. No one is perfect. No one has a past clear of any transgressions, even the smallest ones. No one should have to carry the burden of their past with them when they’re doing nothing more dangerous than walking down a street. Because Darren Wilson knew nothing about Michael Brown when he confronted him. When he killed him.
And we shouldn’t be learning these things about him now, like this. It’s unfair.


Michele telling it like it is.
This is victim blaming and it is a disgrace. Amounting to, “that poor white police officer had no choice but to shoot the unarmed teenager because reasons”. It’s bullshit and has no place in our society. Disgraceful. 

    lnthefade:

    Screen shot from a New York Times article.

    No angel.

    When I was 18, I was no angel. Hell, when I was 15, 16, 17, I was no angel. When I was 13, I stole change out of cars that were parked in the church lot for bingo night. By 14 I was smoking pot every day. I got caught shoplifting at Korvette’s and spent an hour being interrogated by security before they called my mother to pick me up. I cut holes in the pockets of my winter parka to make it easier to steal candy from 7-11. I sold joints to my fellow classmates at Holy Trinity High School. I had rough patches. I cut out of school to drink alcohol. I listened to angry and vulgar punk rock. I often got into fights with kids from the neighboring town.

    So all those times when Officer Goldberg stopped me as I walking down the street and asked where I was going and what I was doing, he would be justified in shooting me because I was a troubled kid with a questionable past?

    See, all those things were not relevant. Because Officer Goldberg didn’t know any of those things about me beforehand. And even if he did, they had no relevance on the fact that I happened to be walking down the street on any given evening.

    Someone’s history does not always define their present. Being a “troubled” kid who once climbed over a baby gate or wrote on the walls in their house with pencils does not mean one deserves to die in a hail of bullets at the hand of a police officer. And it’s odious for anyone to imply as such, especially in a major newspaper on the day of the dead boy’s funeral.

    The media suddenly seems to be in bed with the Ferguson police, posthumously trying Michael Brown for the crime of being young and black while walking in the street, bringing his past into the present. Calling him “no angel” has big implications, none of them good. 

    We’re all “no angels” in one way or another. No one is perfect. No one has a past clear of any transgressions, even the smallest ones. No one should have to carry the burden of their past with them when they’re doing nothing more dangerous than walking down a street. Because Darren Wilson knew nothing about Michael Brown when he confronted him. When he killed him.

    And we shouldn’t be learning these things about him now, like this. It’s unfair.

    Michele telling it like it is.

    This is victim blaming and it is a disgrace. Amounting to, “that poor white police officer had no choice but to shoot the unarmed teenager because reasons”. It’s bullshit and has no place in our society. Disgraceful. 

    Reblogged from: lnthefade
  10. lnthefade:

Well, let’s see.
He was unarmed.
And he was a teen.
So, no.
Assholes.

    lnthefade:

    Well, let’s see.

    He was unarmed.

    And he was a teen.

    So, no.

    Assholes.

    Reblogged from: lnthefade
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