No Idea


  1. essentialisinvisible:

Rob Rogers
  2. ☛ Razr Burn: My Month With 2004's Most Exciting Phone

    iMessage purgatory is a thing that Apple needs to fix. It doesn’t matter what type of phone you’re switching to.

  3. joelhamill wrote...

    Would you ever wear camouflage shorts with a white t-shirt in flip-flops with sandals?

    lnthefade:

    Stop trying to make me dress like you, Joel.

    Wait. How does one wear flip-flops AND sandals? One of each shoe on each foot?

    Never! I will never stop it.

  4. lessig:

At 9:30pm ET, 4 July, this happened, and then all of NH started celebrating — with FIREWORKS no less. (I love this state.) #MaydayPAC

That’s awesome!

    lessig:

    At 9:30pm ET, 4 July, this happened, and then all of NH started celebrating — with FIREWORKS no less. (I love this state.) #MaydayPAC

    That’s awesome!

  5. tastefullyoffensive:

    'Dazed and Confused' on 4th of July. [x]

  6. lnthefade:

My annual Fourth of July warning.

    lnthefade:

    My annual Fourth of July warning.

  7. everythinginthesky:

    Weird Al - Party in the CIA (Parody of ‘Party in the USA’

    Pretty disappointed none of you pointed out this existed.

    tappin’ the phones like yeah
    shreddin’ the files like yeah

  8. You Shall Not Pass

  9. ☛ For Email Newsletters, a Death Greatly Exaggerated

    parislemon:

    From the piece on email newsletters I quoted yesterday, here’s David Carr:

    Newsletters are clicking because readers have grown tired of the endless stream of information on the Internet, and having something finite and recognizable show up in your inbox can impose order on all that chaos. In fact, the comeback of email newsletters has been covered in Fast Company, The Atlantic and Medium, but I missed those articles because, really, who can keep up with a never-ending scroll of new developments? That’s where email newsletters, with their aggregation and summaries, come in. Some are email only, others reprise something that can be found on the web. At a time when lots of news and information is whizzing by online, email newsletters — some free, some not — help us figure out what’s worth paying attention to.

    This makes complete sense. On the infinite internet, it’s impossible to stay on top of everything. So find a curator you trust — and ideally, a few of them since, again, no one person can be on top of everything — and go with that.

    If only there was a Real Simple Syndication method so that you could subscribe to feeds and collect them in an app or program to read when you have the time to read.